Fifteen william stafford essay writer

Line 21 The final line solidifies the ideas and tensions of the entire poem. Life requires both going on and going beyond.

Fifteen by william stafford pdf

Motorcycles: For the generation that valued freedom and that had grown up while the interstate highway system was being built in the s, the motorcycle stood as a symbol of independence. The rational mind takes over and the youth finds the rider. This poem stresses that particular age as being just short of the ability to do what one wants. But it is hard for others to see. I feel like Daniel Boone going into Kentucky. He describes a motorcycle below a bridge. What is special in this poem is the motorcycle. The older stranger, in contrast, has the run of the road. This is the contrast of the Greek Gods Apollo and Dionysus, the fiery sun versus the moon and the muddy earth, the skyscraper versus the woods.

To record such moments, The location of the action—south of the bridge implying a river or streamin back of the willows—is an area that is not entirely urbanized.

He was a teenager after all chasing his dream.

fifteen william stafford analysis

Motorcycles: For the generation that valued freedom and that had grown up while the interstate highway system was being built in the s, the motorcycle stood as a symbol of independence.

When he speaks to Topics for Further Study Think about something impetuous and daring that you almost did when you were younger, that still looks appealing to you at certain times.

What is special in this poem is the motorcycle. Lines These lines give us a precise picture of what the youth discovers in his exploration into nature—a motorcycle in the grass. Perhaps it allows us to feel, by the end of the poem, the emotional and maturity level difference between being 15 and being 17, as well as between boyhood and manhood.

Fifteen william stafford explained

This poem glamorized the motorcycle in a way that is common for a fifteen-year-old, and the owner shows some of that boyish infatuation in the way he runs his hand over it, but the blood and danger present keep the reader from idolizing the machine the way these characters do. The fact that the speaker of the poem was in the high grass on a summer day is conveyed without comment, as if it was nothing special but a common occurrence. The speaker makes the exterior scene come alive by providing vivid sensory detail, but conveys only through metaphor and indirection the interior emotions that moved him as a boy. Conceptual metaphors, as identified by George Lakoff and Mark Johnson in Metaphors We Live By, operate on the level of ideas; thus Stafford does not need to spell out that life is a journey because this metaphor has become part of the cultural context that he shares with his readers. He may have been concerned about the missing rider and gone to look for him, or he may have given up on the idea of riding and returned to the grass before even realizing that the rider was there. It contains its own felt rhythms, with the accents varied within each line. The poems shape themselves, discover their right images and perception and then end, like songs improvised by a sad, gallantly restrained folk-singer. Work Cited Stafford, William. The solitary rider has his trusty vehicle for companion. For the boy to project such human feelings onto the motorcycle indicates a lack of personal involvement in his life. Some of the words have the same sounds such as lines five and seven: "By glow of the tail-light I stumbled back of the car Ezra Pound, working from his Imagist principles, would have done some pruning here; Whitman would have eagerly kept the voice sounds going. In the film, Marlon Brando , the top young box-office star of the day, played the leader of a motorcycle gang that terrorized a small town for no particular reason. Machine This is a rare poem in which machinery is shown in a more positive light than the natural setting around it, possibly because the point of view is that of a fifteen-year-old boy with a narrow range of experiences; he is familiar with nature but new to the wonders of technology.
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“Fifteen” William Stafford