Compare and contrast muslim empires

All three empires ended up at least encouraging, if not enforcing, conversion to Islam it took an extra century or so for the Mughals, but the outcome was the same.

islamic empires

The King monitored the economy very closely. The leaders of each of the empires had Turkic ethnic backgrounds and Islamic roots, and all of the empires developed strong military forces because of this, they are collectively referred to as the Gunpowder Empires. For the Safavids economic side, They took direct interest in economy.

They maintained Islamic law called Sandri'a. Books comparable to those of the European Renaissance were written in fields ranging from mathematics to geography, and many magnificent mosques were built.

Although all three empires faced different religious divides, they ended up dealing with them in much the same way.

Ottoman empire

The capital, Isfahan, contained a number of prominent mosques, one of the most prominent being the Masjid-i Shah. In the Mughal …show more content… Silks were produced under the Sultan leaders, but rugs were a peasant industry. Although each situation was different, the Empires separately came around to using very similar methods of dealing with religious differences. A concubine would leave to raise her son, and when he was given land to govern as a prince, she would go with him and act as his main protector, advisor, and manager of his household [9]. Ottoman minorities were mostly. I find it interesting that throughout history, women are considered lesser and unfit to wield power or make authoritative decisions, and yet on so many occasions, mothers and wives of leaders are the ones guiding their actions. The Safavid Empire mainly united Persian speaking areas, but still faced religious clashes in multiple facets: Muslim vs. Itclaimed to be the true religious authority in the empire, with the shahs only serving as trusts on behalf of the imam. Palace women were placed in essentially the same positions in all three of the Islamic Empires. The Mughal harem also had its own administrative structure, which consisted entirely of women [13]. Many ended up marrying members of the imperial court, and their training helped ensure that they managed their households in accordance with palace norms. This caused commerce and manufacturing to thrive. After having a son, concubines would usually no longer be in contact with the sultan. Although all three empires faced different religious divides, they ended up dealing with them in much the same way. The three Muslim Empires are similar in that they each ruled over subjects with diverse religious and ethnic backgrounds.

One of the most prominent is the Sulaymaniyyah, named after Suleiman the Great, probably the greatest leader of the Ottomans. Each fall into five different categories. The Safavids were unique in that they actively attempted to impose their practices and brands of Shiism on the Sunnis and other Sufi orders in the empire, with non-Muslims also experiencing pressure to convert to Islam, as well as occasional persecution.

gunpowder empires

Despite this, however, the Mughal Empire was a bastion of art, culture, and learning. The three Muslim Empires are similar in that they each ruled over subjects with diverse religious and ethnic backgrounds.

Compare and contrast muslim empires

The pattern of royal concubines and mothers gaining influence shows up in not only the three Muslim Empires, but within European Empires and royal families as well. The harems of the Ottoman and Mughal Empires included all the women of the palace [11, 12].

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Emily Hamlin: Similarities between the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires